Honey is a valuable reservoir of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and, particularly, of fructophilic LAB (FLAB), a relatively novel subgroup of LAB whose functional potential for human and food application has yet to be explored. In this study, FLAB and LAB strains have been isolated from honeys of different floral origins and selected for their broad antimicrobial activity against typical foodborne pathogenic bacteria and spoilage filamentous fungi. The best candidates, two strains belonging to the species Lactiplantibacillus plantarum and Fructobacillus fructosus, were submitted to partial characterisation of their cell free supernatants (CFS) in order to identify the secreted metabolites with antimicrobial activity. Besides, these strains were examined to assess some major functional features, including in vitro tolerance to the oro-gastrointestinal conditions, potential cytotoxicity against HT-29 cells, adhesion to human enterocyte-like cells and capability to stimulate macrophages. Moreover, when the tested strains were applied on table grapes artificially contaminated with pathogenic bacteria or filamentous fungi, they showed a good ability to antagonise the growth of undesired microbes, as well as to survive on the fruit surface at a concentration that is recommended to develop a probiotic effect. In conclusion, both LAB and FLAB honey-isolated strains characterised in this work exhibit functional properties that validate their potential use as biocontrol agents and for the design of novel functional foods. We reported antimicrobial activity, cytotoxic evaluation, probiotic properties and direct food application of a F. fructosus strain, improving the knowledge of this species, in particular, and on FLAB, more generally.

Antimicrobial Properties, Functional Characterisation and Application of Fructobacillus fructosus and Lactiplantibacillus plantarum Isolated from Artisanal Honey

De Simone, Nicola;Rocchetti, Maria Teresa;la Gatta, Barbara;Spano, Giuseppe;Capozzi, Vittorio;Russo, Pasquale;Fiocco, Daniela
2022

Abstract

Honey is a valuable reservoir of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and, particularly, of fructophilic LAB (FLAB), a relatively novel subgroup of LAB whose functional potential for human and food application has yet to be explored. In this study, FLAB and LAB strains have been isolated from honeys of different floral origins and selected for their broad antimicrobial activity against typical foodborne pathogenic bacteria and spoilage filamentous fungi. The best candidates, two strains belonging to the species Lactiplantibacillus plantarum and Fructobacillus fructosus, were submitted to partial characterisation of their cell free supernatants (CFS) in order to identify the secreted metabolites with antimicrobial activity. Besides, these strains were examined to assess some major functional features, including in vitro tolerance to the oro-gastrointestinal conditions, potential cytotoxicity against HT-29 cells, adhesion to human enterocyte-like cells and capability to stimulate macrophages. Moreover, when the tested strains were applied on table grapes artificially contaminated with pathogenic bacteria or filamentous fungi, they showed a good ability to antagonise the growth of undesired microbes, as well as to survive on the fruit surface at a concentration that is recommended to develop a probiotic effect. In conclusion, both LAB and FLAB honey-isolated strains characterised in this work exhibit functional properties that validate their potential use as biocontrol agents and for the design of novel functional foods. We reported antimicrobial activity, cytotoxic evaluation, probiotic properties and direct food application of a F. fructosus strain, improving the knowledge of this species, in particular, and on FLAB, more generally.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/423850
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