Natural and human-made disasters, including civil unrest, terrorism, biological and chemical threats, and war, have affected the world on a recurring basis. These events have caused suffering and misery to populations and have revealed a low degree of self-sufficiency and a high degree of unpreparedness on the part of governments to deal with the consequences.1 Natural and human-made adversity typically generate public health crises and economic instability, with lasting negative effects on the socioeconomic status of populations of all ages. These adverse effects affect children, who are among the most marginalized and vulnerable members of society and rarely consulted when communities make decisions that directly affect them. War is one of the world's most devastating events, requiring short-term interventions and complex long-term recovery planning, articulated in 4 phases—mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery—that focus on the rights of children who are in vulnerable circumstances and, therefore, at greater risk of harm. This commentary, authored by members of the board of directors of the European Pediatric Association–Union of National Pediatric Societies and Associations (EPA-UNEPSA), briefly discusses the plight of children exposed to situations of terror and horror during war, including severe loss and disruption in their lives, which can result in the lasting effects of post-traumatic stress disorder. Our goal is to raise awareness among pediatricians and public health authorities of the importance of developing programs directed toward the rehabilitation of children affected by war, including social healing and peace culture education, as a key approach to primary prevention of the recurrence of war.

Advocating for Children Trapped in the Midst of Armed Conflicts.

Pettoello-Mantovani M
;
2022

Abstract

Natural and human-made disasters, including civil unrest, terrorism, biological and chemical threats, and war, have affected the world on a recurring basis. These events have caused suffering and misery to populations and have revealed a low degree of self-sufficiency and a high degree of unpreparedness on the part of governments to deal with the consequences.1 Natural and human-made adversity typically generate public health crises and economic instability, with lasting negative effects on the socioeconomic status of populations of all ages. These adverse effects affect children, who are among the most marginalized and vulnerable members of society and rarely consulted when communities make decisions that directly affect them. War is one of the world's most devastating events, requiring short-term interventions and complex long-term recovery planning, articulated in 4 phases—mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery—that focus on the rights of children who are in vulnerable circumstances and, therefore, at greater risk of harm. This commentary, authored by members of the board of directors of the European Pediatric Association–Union of National Pediatric Societies and Associations (EPA-UNEPSA), briefly discusses the plight of children exposed to situations of terror and horror during war, including severe loss and disruption in their lives, which can result in the lasting effects of post-traumatic stress disorder. Our goal is to raise awareness among pediatricians and public health authorities of the importance of developing programs directed toward the rehabilitation of children affected by war, including social healing and peace culture education, as a key approach to primary prevention of the recurrence of war.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/419855
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