In this study, we explored the diversity of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) associated with six spontaneous sourdough fermentations from the northern part of the Apulian region (Italy). Bacterial and yeast isolates from sourdough were investigated by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, respectively. The identification of the isolates was confirmed by sequencing bacterial 16S gene and yeast ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rRNA gene amplicons. Microbiological analysis of all sourdough samples revealed that LAB and yeast counts ranged between 1.7 × 105 and 6.5 × 108 cfu/g, and 7.7 × 105 and 2.5 × 107 cfu/g, respectively. The molecular identification at species level revealed the occurrence of Lactobacillus plantarum as the dominant LAB and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the dominant yeast species in all different sourdough samples. Then, the ability of all isolated strains to inhibit and/or reduce the growth of several selected fungi was valued through the overlay method. In light of their antifungal performances, ten LAB strains were inoculated, singularly and in combination, in subsequent bread-making trials. Overall, we confirmed the potential of LAB to extend the shelf life of bread through spoilage inhibition and, for the first time, we observed a synergistic effect due to the combination of several isolated LAB on the inhibition behavior against selected fungal spoilage strains. Our findings suggest the exploration of a LAB-based approach in order to extend the shelf life of bread, reducing, at the same time, the use of chemical agents for food preservation.

Exploration of the microbial biodiversity associated with North Apulian sourdoughs and the effect of the increasing number of inoculated lactic acid bacteria strains on the biocontrol against fungal spoilage

Arena M. P.;Russo P.;Spano G.;
2019-01-01

Abstract

In this study, we explored the diversity of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) associated with six spontaneous sourdough fermentations from the northern part of the Apulian region (Italy). Bacterial and yeast isolates from sourdough were investigated by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, respectively. The identification of the isolates was confirmed by sequencing bacterial 16S gene and yeast ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rRNA gene amplicons. Microbiological analysis of all sourdough samples revealed that LAB and yeast counts ranged between 1.7 × 105 and 6.5 × 108 cfu/g, and 7.7 × 105 and 2.5 × 107 cfu/g, respectively. The molecular identification at species level revealed the occurrence of Lactobacillus plantarum as the dominant LAB and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the dominant yeast species in all different sourdough samples. Then, the ability of all isolated strains to inhibit and/or reduce the growth of several selected fungi was valued through the overlay method. In light of their antifungal performances, ten LAB strains were inoculated, singularly and in combination, in subsequent bread-making trials. Overall, we confirmed the potential of LAB to extend the shelf life of bread through spoilage inhibition and, for the first time, we observed a synergistic effect due to the combination of several isolated LAB on the inhibition behavior against selected fungal spoilage strains. Our findings suggest the exploration of a LAB-based approach in order to extend the shelf life of bread, reducing, at the same time, the use of chemical agents for food preservation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/403878
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