Agomelatine (AGM) is one of the latest atypical antidepressants, prescribed exclusively for the treatment of depression in adults. AGM belongs to the pharmaceutical class of melatonin agonist and selective serotonin antagonist ("MASS"), as it acts both as a selective agonist of melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2, and as a selective antagonist of 5-HT2C/5-HT2B receptors. AGM is involved in the resynchronization of interrupted circadian rhythms, with beneficial effects on sleep patterns, while antagonism on serotonin receptors increases the availability of norepinephrine and dopamine in the prefrontal cortex, with an antidepressant and nootropic effect. The use of AGM in the pediatric population is limited by the scarcity of data. In addition, few studies and case reports have been published on the use of AGM in patients with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Considering this evidence, the purpose of this review is to report the potential role of AGM in neurological developmental disorders. AGM would increase the expression of the cytoskeleton-associated protein (ARC) in the prefrontal cortex, with optimization of learning, long-term memory consolidation, and improved survival of neurons. Another important feature of AGM is the ability to modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission in regions associated with mood and cognition. With its synergistic activity a melatoninergic agonist and an antagonist of 5-HT2C, AGM acts as an antidepressant, psychostimulant, and promoter of neuronal plasticity, regulating cognitive symptoms, resynchronizing circadian rhythms in patients with autism, ADHD, anxiety, and depression. Given its good tolerability and good compliance, it could potentially be administered to adolescents and children.

Agomelatine: A Potential Multitarget Compound for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Savino, Rosa;Ventriglio, Antonio;Di Salvatore, Melanie;De Stefano, Maria Ida;Valenzano, Anna;Marinaccio, Luigi;Bellomo, Antonello;Cibelli, Giuseppe;Monda, Vincenzo;Polito, Rita;Messina, Giovanni
2023-01-01

Abstract

Agomelatine (AGM) is one of the latest atypical antidepressants, prescribed exclusively for the treatment of depression in adults. AGM belongs to the pharmaceutical class of melatonin agonist and selective serotonin antagonist ("MASS"), as it acts both as a selective agonist of melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2, and as a selective antagonist of 5-HT2C/5-HT2B receptors. AGM is involved in the resynchronization of interrupted circadian rhythms, with beneficial effects on sleep patterns, while antagonism on serotonin receptors increases the availability of norepinephrine and dopamine in the prefrontal cortex, with an antidepressant and nootropic effect. The use of AGM in the pediatric population is limited by the scarcity of data. In addition, few studies and case reports have been published on the use of AGM in patients with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Considering this evidence, the purpose of this review is to report the potential role of AGM in neurological developmental disorders. AGM would increase the expression of the cytoskeleton-associated protein (ARC) in the prefrontal cortex, with optimization of learning, long-term memory consolidation, and improved survival of neurons. Another important feature of AGM is the ability to modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission in regions associated with mood and cognition. With its synergistic activity a melatoninergic agonist and an antagonist of 5-HT2C, AGM acts as an antidepressant, psychostimulant, and promoter of neuronal plasticity, regulating cognitive symptoms, resynchronizing circadian rhythms in patients with autism, ADHD, anxiety, and depression. Given its good tolerability and good compliance, it could potentially be administered to adolescents and children.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/453029
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