Simple Summary Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a rare and aggressive subtype of systemic mastocytosis (SM). MCL diagnosis requires fulfillment of diagnostic criteria for SM plus at least 20% immature/atypical mast cells on bone marrow smear. Based on different clinicopathological characteristics, MCL is subdivided into the following variants: primary (de novo) or secondary (from a prior SM form); acute with C-findings (where C-findings represent organ damage requiring cytoreductive treatment) or chronic without C-findings; and finally, MCL with or without an associated hematological neoplasm. The latter category was renamed MCL with an associated myeloid neoplasm in the 2022 International Consensus Classification (ICC). The relevance of the distinction between the leukemic and aleukemic forms, based on the percentage of circulating mast cells, is under discussion. In this study, we review the current knowledge on MCL with the aim of increasing clinicians' and pathologists' awareness of this rare, still incompletely understood disease with a grim prognosis. Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is the leukemic form of SM with at least 20% mostly immature mast cells on bone marrow aspirate. MCL may develop de novo, in the absence of a prior SM, or it may represent a progression from a previous SM. MCL may be sub-divided into the more frequent, aggressive acute form with signs of organ damage (C-findings) and the chronic form lacking C-findings and presenting a more stable course, although over time, progression to acute MCL is common. The 2022 WHO subtype of MCL with an associated hematological neoplasm was renamed MCL with an associated myeloid neoplasm in the 2022 International Consensus Classification (ICC). The relevance of the distinction between the leukemic and aleukemic forms based on the percentage of circulating mast cells is a matter of debate. The current knowledge on MCL is restricted mainly to single reports or case series with a limited number of larger studies. Our aim is to provide a comprehensive overview of this rare disease in terms of clinical manifestations, morphology, phenotype, molecular characteristics, differential diagnosis, outcome and treatment. A general overview on mastocytosis is also included.

Mast Cell Leukemia: An Update with a Practical Review

Sanguedolce, Francesca;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Simple Summary Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a rare and aggressive subtype of systemic mastocytosis (SM). MCL diagnosis requires fulfillment of diagnostic criteria for SM plus at least 20% immature/atypical mast cells on bone marrow smear. Based on different clinicopathological characteristics, MCL is subdivided into the following variants: primary (de novo) or secondary (from a prior SM form); acute with C-findings (where C-findings represent organ damage requiring cytoreductive treatment) or chronic without C-findings; and finally, MCL with or without an associated hematological neoplasm. The latter category was renamed MCL with an associated myeloid neoplasm in the 2022 International Consensus Classification (ICC). The relevance of the distinction between the leukemic and aleukemic forms, based on the percentage of circulating mast cells, is under discussion. In this study, we review the current knowledge on MCL with the aim of increasing clinicians' and pathologists' awareness of this rare, still incompletely understood disease with a grim prognosis. Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is the leukemic form of SM with at least 20% mostly immature mast cells on bone marrow aspirate. MCL may develop de novo, in the absence of a prior SM, or it may represent a progression from a previous SM. MCL may be sub-divided into the more frequent, aggressive acute form with signs of organ damage (C-findings) and the chronic form lacking C-findings and presenting a more stable course, although over time, progression to acute MCL is common. The 2022 WHO subtype of MCL with an associated hematological neoplasm was renamed MCL with an associated myeloid neoplasm in the 2022 International Consensus Classification (ICC). The relevance of the distinction between the leukemic and aleukemic forms based on the percentage of circulating mast cells is a matter of debate. The current knowledge on MCL is restricted mainly to single reports or case series with a limited number of larger studies. Our aim is to provide a comprehensive overview of this rare disease in terms of clinical manifestations, morphology, phenotype, molecular characteristics, differential diagnosis, outcome and treatment. A general overview on mastocytosis is also included.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/446177
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