The use of ketamine in patients with TBI has often been argued due to its possible deleterious effects on cerebral circulation and perfusion. Early studies suggested that ketamine could increase intracranial pressure, decreasing cerebral perfusion pressure and thereby reducing oxygen supply to the damaged cerebral cortex. Some recent studies have refuted these conclusions relating to the role of ketamine, especially in patients with TBI, showing that ketamine should be the first-choice drug in this type of patient at induction. Our narrative review collects evidence on ketamine's use in patients with TBI. Databases were examined for studies in which ketamine had been used in acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). The outcomes considered in this narrative review were: mortality of patients with TBI; impact on intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure; blood pressure and heart rate values; depolarization rate; and preserved neurological functions. 11 recent studies passed inclusion and exclusion criteria and were included in this review. Despite all the benefits reported in the literature, the use of ketamine in patients with brain injury still appears to be limited. A slight increase in intracranial pressure was found in only two studies, while two smaller studies showed a reduction in intracranial pressure after ketamine administration. There was no evidence of harm from the ketamine's use in patients with TBI.

Ketamine in Acute Brain Injury: Current Opinion Following Cerebral Circulation and Electrical Activity

Bertozzi, Giuseppe;De Simone, Stefania;Cipolloni, Luigi;La Russa, Raffaele
2022-01-01

Abstract

The use of ketamine in patients with TBI has often been argued due to its possible deleterious effects on cerebral circulation and perfusion. Early studies suggested that ketamine could increase intracranial pressure, decreasing cerebral perfusion pressure and thereby reducing oxygen supply to the damaged cerebral cortex. Some recent studies have refuted these conclusions relating to the role of ketamine, especially in patients with TBI, showing that ketamine should be the first-choice drug in this type of patient at induction. Our narrative review collects evidence on ketamine's use in patients with TBI. Databases were examined for studies in which ketamine had been used in acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). The outcomes considered in this narrative review were: mortality of patients with TBI; impact on intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure; blood pressure and heart rate values; depolarization rate; and preserved neurological functions. 11 recent studies passed inclusion and exclusion criteria and were included in this review. Despite all the benefits reported in the literature, the use of ketamine in patients with brain injury still appears to be limited. A slight increase in intracranial pressure was found in only two studies, while two smaller studies showed a reduction in intracranial pressure after ketamine administration. There was no evidence of harm from the ketamine's use in patients with TBI.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/431345
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