There is a paucity of literature regarding the psycho-physiological profiles of sailors on board. This study aimed at providing empirical evidence on the individual differences between bowmen and helmsmen taking into account a biopsychological perspective. To this purpose, sailors’ profiles were examined by focusing on the association between personality traits and basal cortisol. The sample was composed of 104 athletes (Mage = 21.32, SD = 0.098; F = 35%), who fulfilled a self-reported questionnaire including a socio-demographic section and the Big Five questionnaire. Cortisol samples were collected on the day before the competition, within 30 min after awakening. T-test analysis showed significant differences on cortisol levels: bowmen obtained higher levels on cortisol responses compared to helmsmen. No differences emerged on personality traits between athletes’ roles. Bivariate associations showed positive associations of cortisol responses with extraversion and conscientiousness in bowmen, whereas no significant associations of cortisol with personality traits were found in helmsmen. Regression analyses confirmed that sex and extraversion predicted higher level of cortisol responses. Results were discussed in terms of a bio-psychosocial theoretical approach and provided findings on the relationships between personality trait and the hypothalamus-pituitary adrenal (HPA) system in dinghy sailors. Suggestions for a more suitable selection of sailor roles were given to coaches in order to improve athletes’ performance.

Associations between personality traits and basal cortisol responses in sailing athletes

Limone P.
Supervision
;
Monacis L.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
2021-01-01

Abstract

There is a paucity of literature regarding the psycho-physiological profiles of sailors on board. This study aimed at providing empirical evidence on the individual differences between bowmen and helmsmen taking into account a biopsychological perspective. To this purpose, sailors’ profiles were examined by focusing on the association between personality traits and basal cortisol. The sample was composed of 104 athletes (Mage = 21.32, SD = 0.098; F = 35%), who fulfilled a self-reported questionnaire including a socio-demographic section and the Big Five questionnaire. Cortisol samples were collected on the day before the competition, within 30 min after awakening. T-test analysis showed significant differences on cortisol levels: bowmen obtained higher levels on cortisol responses compared to helmsmen. No differences emerged on personality traits between athletes’ roles. Bivariate associations showed positive associations of cortisol responses with extraversion and conscientiousness in bowmen, whereas no significant associations of cortisol with personality traits were found in helmsmen. Regression analyses confirmed that sex and extraversion predicted higher level of cortisol responses. Results were discussed in terms of a bio-psychosocial theoretical approach and provided findings on the relationships between personality trait and the hypothalamus-pituitary adrenal (HPA) system in dinghy sailors. Suggestions for a more suitable selection of sailor roles were given to coaches in order to improve athletes’ performance.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/403282
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