Due to the increasing number of studies reporting the detection of antimicrobial-resistant isolates of Listeria monocytogenes, we sought to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of L. monocytogenes isolates collected in Italy and find potential correlations to their serotypes and multilocus sequence types (MLST). The antimicrobial susceptibility of 317 L. monocytogenes isolates collected from food, humans, and the environment from 1998 to 2009 was assessed by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Serotyping and MLST was also performed on all isolates. Potential correlations among antimicrobial resistance profiles, serotyping, and MLST were statistically evaluated. Twenty-four percent of L. monocytogenes isolates were resistant to oxacillin, 28.7% intermediate to clindamycin, and 24.3% to ciprofloxacin. The majority of isolates with elevated MIC to oxacillin was of environmental origin and belonged to serotype 4b/4e and ST2. Isolates with intermediate MIC values to clindamycin and ciprofloxacin were mostly of food and human origin and belonged to serotype 4b/4e and ST9. Regarding the time frame of isolate collection, comparing the last 3 years (2007–2009) to previous years (1998–2006), an increase was observed in the percentage of resistant and intermediate isolates per year. This trend strongly suggests the need for increasing attention on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in L. monocytogenes in Italy. To predict future resistance trends, the monitoring of clinical intermediate resistance might represent a useful tool especially for antibiotics associated to multiple-step mechanisms of acquired resistance. A specific focus should be addressed to antimicrobial-resistant isolates of serotype 4b, repeatedly associated with food-borne outbreaks.

Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Multilocus Sequence Typing of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated Over 11 Years from Food, Humans, and the Environment in Italy

Giovanni Normanno;Antonio Parisi
2020

Abstract

Due to the increasing number of studies reporting the detection of antimicrobial-resistant isolates of Listeria monocytogenes, we sought to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of L. monocytogenes isolates collected in Italy and find potential correlations to their serotypes and multilocus sequence types (MLST). The antimicrobial susceptibility of 317 L. monocytogenes isolates collected from food, humans, and the environment from 1998 to 2009 was assessed by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Serotyping and MLST was also performed on all isolates. Potential correlations among antimicrobial resistance profiles, serotyping, and MLST were statistically evaluated. Twenty-four percent of L. monocytogenes isolates were resistant to oxacillin, 28.7% intermediate to clindamycin, and 24.3% to ciprofloxacin. The majority of isolates with elevated MIC to oxacillin was of environmental origin and belonged to serotype 4b/4e and ST2. Isolates with intermediate MIC values to clindamycin and ciprofloxacin were mostly of food and human origin and belonged to serotype 4b/4e and ST9. Regarding the time frame of isolate collection, comparing the last 3 years (2007–2009) to previous years (1998–2006), an increase was observed in the percentage of resistant and intermediate isolates per year. This trend strongly suggests the need for increasing attention on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in L. monocytogenes in Italy. To predict future resistance trends, the monitoring of clinical intermediate resistance might represent a useful tool especially for antibiotics associated to multiple-step mechanisms of acquired resistance. A specific focus should be addressed to antimicrobial-resistant isolates of serotype 4b, repeatedly associated with food-borne outbreaks.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/384811
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