Aging is a physiologic/pathologic process characterized by a progressive impairment of cellular functions, supported by the alterations of several molecular pathways, leading to an increased cell susceptibility to injury. This deterioration is the primary risk factor for several major human pathologies. Numerous cellular processes, including genomic instability, telomere erosion, epigenetic alterations, loss of proteostasis, deregulated nutrient-sensing, mitochondrial dysfunction, stem cell exhaustion, and altered intercellular signal transduction represent common denominators of aging in different organisms. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an evolutionarily conserved nutrient sensing protein kinase that regulates growth and metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. Studies in flies, worms, yeast, and mice support the hypothesis that the mTOR signalling network plays a pivotal role in modulating aging. mTOR is emerging as the most robust mediator of the protective effects of various forms of dietary restriction, which has been shown to extend lifespan and slow the onset of age-related diseases across species. Herein we discuss the role of mTor signalling network in the development of classic age-related diseases, focused on cardiovascular system, immune response, and cancer.

MTOR and aging: An old fashioned dress

Stallone G.;Infante B.;PRISCIANDARO, CONCETTA;Grandaliano G.
2019-01-01

Abstract

Aging is a physiologic/pathologic process characterized by a progressive impairment of cellular functions, supported by the alterations of several molecular pathways, leading to an increased cell susceptibility to injury. This deterioration is the primary risk factor for several major human pathologies. Numerous cellular processes, including genomic instability, telomere erosion, epigenetic alterations, loss of proteostasis, deregulated nutrient-sensing, mitochondrial dysfunction, stem cell exhaustion, and altered intercellular signal transduction represent common denominators of aging in different organisms. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an evolutionarily conserved nutrient sensing protein kinase that regulates growth and metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. Studies in flies, worms, yeast, and mice support the hypothesis that the mTOR signalling network plays a pivotal role in modulating aging. mTOR is emerging as the most robust mediator of the protective effects of various forms of dietary restriction, which has been shown to extend lifespan and slow the onset of age-related diseases across species. Herein we discuss the role of mTor signalling network in the development of classic age-related diseases, focused on cardiovascular system, immune response, and cancer.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/381185
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