CYCLOSPORA IN ITALY: CURRENT SITUATION AND PERSPECTIVES* Annunziata Giangaspero1, Alessandra Barlaam1, Marianna Marangi1, Simone M. Cacciò2, Kristoffer Tysnes3 and Lucy Robertson3 1Department of Agriculture Science, Food and Environment, University of Foggia, Italy; 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy; 3NMBU, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Norway Foodborne transmission of Cyclospora cayetanensis is of growing importance and numerous studies have shown considerable levels of Cyclospora contamination on fresh produce, with the highest prevalence in South-American countries. In the USA, large outbreaks of cyclosporiasis have increasingly been linked to various types of imported fresh produce, with summer outbreaks over the last 5 years. In 2018, about 2,300 laboratory-confirmed cases were reported, associated with different fresh produce. Despite the growing importation of fresh produce from endemic areas, and the link of such products to cyclosporiasis outbreaks in Germany and Sweden, C. cayetanensis has received much less attention as a foodborne pathogen in Europe compared to North America. In Italy, although no outbreaks have been recorded, C. cayetanensis DNA has been detected in environmental (water and soil) (6-21%) and vegetables samples grown in Italy, with the highest prevalence on fennel (18.7%) and in packaged ready to eat mixed salads (1.3%), indicating wide circulation of this protozoan pathogen. Autochthonous cases of this disease have been recorded in Italy; however, the abovementioned results - coupled with a worrying high prevalence (27.5%) detected in humans (mainly native Italians) - signal the need for a better exploration of the public health significance of Cyclospora in Italy, i.e., widening and deepening the knowledge on the contamination of fresh produce in the European scenario using validated molecular protocols – which are currently being tested – to provide data for a reliable evaluation of the risk for consumers. This comprehensive approach would provide a shared direction for monitoring fresh produce, which, together with the application of good hygiene practices and the implementation of HACCP procedures, would lead to a reduction of the potential risk of Cyclospora transmission.

Cyclospora in italy: current situation and perpectives

Annunziata Giangaspero
Conceptualization
;
BARLAAM, ALESSANDRA
Investigation
;
Marianna Marangi
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2019

Abstract

CYCLOSPORA IN ITALY: CURRENT SITUATION AND PERSPECTIVES* Annunziata Giangaspero1, Alessandra Barlaam1, Marianna Marangi1, Simone M. Cacciò2, Kristoffer Tysnes3 and Lucy Robertson3 1Department of Agriculture Science, Food and Environment, University of Foggia, Italy; 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy; 3NMBU, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Norway Foodborne transmission of Cyclospora cayetanensis is of growing importance and numerous studies have shown considerable levels of Cyclospora contamination on fresh produce, with the highest prevalence in South-American countries. In the USA, large outbreaks of cyclosporiasis have increasingly been linked to various types of imported fresh produce, with summer outbreaks over the last 5 years. In 2018, about 2,300 laboratory-confirmed cases were reported, associated with different fresh produce. Despite the growing importation of fresh produce from endemic areas, and the link of such products to cyclosporiasis outbreaks in Germany and Sweden, C. cayetanensis has received much less attention as a foodborne pathogen in Europe compared to North America. In Italy, although no outbreaks have been recorded, C. cayetanensis DNA has been detected in environmental (water and soil) (6-21%) and vegetables samples grown in Italy, with the highest prevalence on fennel (18.7%) and in packaged ready to eat mixed salads (1.3%), indicating wide circulation of this protozoan pathogen. Autochthonous cases of this disease have been recorded in Italy; however, the abovementioned results - coupled with a worrying high prevalence (27.5%) detected in humans (mainly native Italians) - signal the need for a better exploration of the public health significance of Cyclospora in Italy, i.e., widening and deepening the knowledge on the contamination of fresh produce in the European scenario using validated molecular protocols – which are currently being tested – to provide data for a reliable evaluation of the risk for consumers. This comprehensive approach would provide a shared direction for monitoring fresh produce, which, together with the application of good hygiene practices and the implementation of HACCP procedures, would lead to a reduction of the potential risk of Cyclospora transmission.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/375781
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