Background: Potential predictors of clinical complications of Takotsubo syndrome (TTS) are poorly known. Persistent ST-segment elevation (PSTE) may have an impact on outcome similar as previously reported in acute coronary syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and prognostic relevance of PSTE in patients with TTS. Methods: Two-hundred-sixty-nine consecutive patients were enrolled in an international multicenter registry. PSTE was defined as the documentation of ST-elevation at least for the first 48. h of hospitalization. Long-term mortality was evaluated in median 1.9. years after the acute event. Results: PSTE was found in 52 TTS patients (19%). Patients with PSTE were characterized by higher admission levels of troponin-I (23. ±. 12 vs 8. ±. 49. ng/L, p <. 0.001), experienced a longer hospitalization (10. ±. 5 vs 8. ±. 3. days, p = 0.02) and a higher rate of in-hospital complications (31% vs 17% p = 0.03).At multivariate analysis including PSTE, age, male sex, admission ejection fraction, PSTE (odds ratio [OR] 4.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-13; p = 0.01), age (OR 1.05; 95%CI 1.00-1.10; p = 0.03) and admission ejection fraction (OR 0.93; 95%CI 0.87-0.99; p = 0.02) were independent predictors of in-hospital complications. At long-term follow-up no significant differences in terms of mortality were observed between patients with and without PSTE (19% vs 15%; p = 0.5). However, PSTE was a predictor of major cardiac adverse events (MACE) at follow-up (HR 2.32, 95% CI 1.02-5.31, p 0.045). Conclusions: In TTS patients, PSTE is a common finding, represents an independent predictor of in-hospital complications and could be associated with MACE at follow-up.

Impact of persistent ST elevation on outcome in patients with Takotsubo syndrome. Results from the GErman Italian STress Cardiomyopathy (GEIST) registry

Santoro, Francesco;Tarantino, Nicola;Guastafierro, Francesca;Di Martino, Luigi F. M.;Di Biase, Matteo;Brunetti, Natale Daniele
2017-01-01

Abstract

Background: Potential predictors of clinical complications of Takotsubo syndrome (TTS) are poorly known. Persistent ST-segment elevation (PSTE) may have an impact on outcome similar as previously reported in acute coronary syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and prognostic relevance of PSTE in patients with TTS. Methods: Two-hundred-sixty-nine consecutive patients were enrolled in an international multicenter registry. PSTE was defined as the documentation of ST-elevation at least for the first 48. h of hospitalization. Long-term mortality was evaluated in median 1.9. years after the acute event. Results: PSTE was found in 52 TTS patients (19%). Patients with PSTE were characterized by higher admission levels of troponin-I (23. ±. 12 vs 8. ±. 49. ng/L, p <. 0.001), experienced a longer hospitalization (10. ±. 5 vs 8. ±. 3. days, p = 0.02) and a higher rate of in-hospital complications (31% vs 17% p = 0.03).At multivariate analysis including PSTE, age, male sex, admission ejection fraction, PSTE (odds ratio [OR] 4.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-13; p = 0.01), age (OR 1.05; 95%CI 1.00-1.10; p = 0.03) and admission ejection fraction (OR 0.93; 95%CI 0.87-0.99; p = 0.02) were independent predictors of in-hospital complications. At long-term follow-up no significant differences in terms of mortality were observed between patients with and without PSTE (19% vs 15%; p = 0.5). However, PSTE was a predictor of major cardiac adverse events (MACE) at follow-up (HR 2.32, 95% CI 1.02-5.31, p 0.045). Conclusions: In TTS patients, PSTE is a common finding, represents an independent predictor of in-hospital complications and could be associated with MACE at follow-up.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/364297
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