Influenza vaccination is strongly recommended for Italian healthcare professionals, but vaccine coverage is low. Since 2012, vaccination is also offered to medical students as part of the National Immunization Plan; however, few Medical Schools has implemented the plan so far. To study determinants of vaccination compliance, we conducted a survey among medical students at the University of Bari, where influenza vaccination has been actively offered since 2013. Information was obtained by means of an online anonymous questionnaire administered in April 2014. We enrolled 669 students, 383 (57%) vaccinated; 54% were female and the average age was 23.9 ± 4.9 y. Determinants of getting vaccinated were analyzed in a multivariate logistic model. Receiving invitation from the University (aOR = 3.8; 95%CI = 1.2–12.3; p = 0.026), the opinion that vaccine is safe (aOR = 2.8; 95%CI = 1.5–5.0; p = 0.001) and useful (aOR = 3.4; 95%CI = 1.7–6.7; p<0.0001), a specific training about influenza vaccination during the course (aOR = 1.5; 95%CI = 1.1–2.1; p = 0.043), and considering himself as at a major risk of influenza complication (aOR = 1.8; 95% CI = 1.1–2.9; p = 0.001) were significantly associated with vaccine acceptance. Active invitation and training are confirmed as key actions (as in children vaccination strategies) and, according to our results, they could be routinely used to promote vaccination in hard-to-reach groups such as healthcare workers.

Medical students' attitude toward influenza vaccination: Results of a survey in the University of Bari (Italy)

CAPPELLI, MARIA GIOVANNA;FORTUNATO, FRANCESCA;MARTINELLI, DOMENICO;QUARTO, MICHELE;PRATO, ROSA;TAFURI, SILVIO
2017-01-01

Abstract

Influenza vaccination is strongly recommended for Italian healthcare professionals, but vaccine coverage is low. Since 2012, vaccination is also offered to medical students as part of the National Immunization Plan; however, few Medical Schools has implemented the plan so far. To study determinants of vaccination compliance, we conducted a survey among medical students at the University of Bari, where influenza vaccination has been actively offered since 2013. Information was obtained by means of an online anonymous questionnaire administered in April 2014. We enrolled 669 students, 383 (57%) vaccinated; 54% were female and the average age was 23.9 ± 4.9 y. Determinants of getting vaccinated were analyzed in a multivariate logistic model. Receiving invitation from the University (aOR = 3.8; 95%CI = 1.2–12.3; p = 0.026), the opinion that vaccine is safe (aOR = 2.8; 95%CI = 1.5–5.0; p = 0.001) and useful (aOR = 3.4; 95%CI = 1.7–6.7; p<0.0001), a specific training about influenza vaccination during the course (aOR = 1.5; 95%CI = 1.1–2.1; p = 0.043), and considering himself as at a major risk of influenza complication (aOR = 1.8; 95% CI = 1.1–2.9; p = 0.001) were significantly associated with vaccine acceptance. Active invitation and training are confirmed as key actions (as in children vaccination strategies) and, according to our results, they could be routinely used to promote vaccination in hard-to-reach groups such as healthcare workers.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/360754
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