This retrospective multicentre study aims to evaluate the clinical and epidemiological features of HCV infection in a cohort of immigrants in Italy. Tests were carried out on 194 HCV positive subjects, who represented 5.7% of the participants at baseline screening: the virological (viral load, genotype) and biochemical appearance of their infection was determined, and the disease was staged by histological examination in the patients who had indicated their willingness. Standard therapy (peg-interferon + ribavirin) was implemented in patients who agreed to undergo treatment. The majority of immigrants were of East-European origin (48.4%), females were globally slightly predominant and the average age was 41.4 years. Of the 194 patients, 119 (63.1%) proved to be viraemic: genotype 1 was the most frequent, followed by genotype 4, the latter mainly in African patients. The histological staging of liver disease conducted in 25 patients showed mild hepatitis in 13 subjects, moderate/severe hepatitis in eight subjects and cirrhosis in four. Although 45 out of 119 patients (37.8%) with determinable HCV RNA agreed to undergo treatment, 11 of them independently stopped taking medication before the course of therapy was completed, without any significant side effects. At the sixth month of follow-up, the overall sustained virological response (SVR) was shown by 22/45 patients (48.8%). In our study, migrant populations had higher rates of HCV-related chronic hepatitis than the indigenous population; in some cases the infections were contracted in the country of origin, but in others the infection took place in Italy. The most commonly represented genotype, besides 1, was 4, especially among Africans. The therapeutic management of immigrants proved to be very difficult, mostly but not exclusively because of social factors.

Hepatitis C and immigration: a multicentre study

SCOTTO, GAETANO;LO MUZIO, LORENZO;
2016

Abstract

This retrospective multicentre study aims to evaluate the clinical and epidemiological features of HCV infection in a cohort of immigrants in Italy. Tests were carried out on 194 HCV positive subjects, who represented 5.7% of the participants at baseline screening: the virological (viral load, genotype) and biochemical appearance of their infection was determined, and the disease was staged by histological examination in the patients who had indicated their willingness. Standard therapy (peg-interferon + ribavirin) was implemented in patients who agreed to undergo treatment. The majority of immigrants were of East-European origin (48.4%), females were globally slightly predominant and the average age was 41.4 years. Of the 194 patients, 119 (63.1%) proved to be viraemic: genotype 1 was the most frequent, followed by genotype 4, the latter mainly in African patients. The histological staging of liver disease conducted in 25 patients showed mild hepatitis in 13 subjects, moderate/severe hepatitis in eight subjects and cirrhosis in four. Although 45 out of 119 patients (37.8%) with determinable HCV RNA agreed to undergo treatment, 11 of them independently stopped taking medication before the course of therapy was completed, without any significant side effects. At the sixth month of follow-up, the overall sustained virological response (SVR) was shown by 22/45 patients (48.8%). In our study, migrant populations had higher rates of HCV-related chronic hepatitis than the indigenous population; in some cases the infections were contracted in the country of origin, but in others the infection took place in Italy. The most commonly represented genotype, besides 1, was 4, especially among Africans. The therapeutic management of immigrants proved to be very difficult, mostly but not exclusively because of social factors.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/354791
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