The problem of modern translations of antique texts gets a meaningful testing ground in a well known section of the Augustinian Confessions (1, 16, 26), which draws on a passage of Terentius (Eun. 584-591) [M. M.]. Terence’s mention of Eun. 584-591 in Aug., conf. 1, 16, 26 and civ. 2, 7, although it cannot be taken into account as a direct quotation, offers a reading in l. 591 from Eunuchus (At quem deum qui templa caeli summo sonitu concutit), summo sonitu, different from the agreed upon one templa caeli summa supplied by direct textual tradition. Such a reading is worth being considered, because, although it is almost unique (summo is attested in Terence’s editio princeps), it is acceptable when we examine both the metrical and stylistic nature of the line, and its semantic value. The investigation of this reading as a hypothetical variant is of some importance considering that the relative clause qui templa caeli summa sonitu concutit is debated as Ennian quotation (scen. 380 V.), on the basis of Aelius Donatus’ commentary ad loc. [A. L.].

Agostino e Terenzio, o del problema delle traduzioni

MARIN, MARCELLO
2006

Abstract

The problem of modern translations of antique texts gets a meaningful testing ground in a well known section of the Augustinian Confessions (1, 16, 26), which draws on a passage of Terentius (Eun. 584-591) [M. M.]. Terence’s mention of Eun. 584-591 in Aug., conf. 1, 16, 26 and civ. 2, 7, although it cannot be taken into account as a direct quotation, offers a reading in l. 591 from Eunuchus (At quem deum qui templa caeli summo sonitu concutit), summo sonitu, different from the agreed upon one templa caeli summa supplied by direct textual tradition. Such a reading is worth being considered, because, although it is almost unique (summo is attested in Terence’s editio princeps), it is acceptable when we examine both the metrical and stylistic nature of the line, and its semantic value. The investigation of this reading as a hypothetical variant is of some importance considering that the relative clause qui templa caeli summa sonitu concutit is debated as Ennian quotation (scen. 380 V.), on the basis of Aelius Donatus’ commentary ad loc. [A. L.].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/11106
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