The article examines Nabokov’s theory and practice of self-translation in three paradigmatic cases: the novel Laughter in the Dark, the short story “Vozvraschenie Chorba”, and the autobiography Speak, Memory, self-translated into Russian as Drugie berega (1954), re-written in English in a revised and extended edition in 1966, and somehow completed in a fictional text titled Look at the Harlequins! (1974).

Self-Translation in Nabokov’s Fiction: Three Paradigmatic Cases

Michele Russo
2020-01-01

Abstract

The article examines Nabokov’s theory and practice of self-translation in three paradigmatic cases: the novel Laughter in the Dark, the short story “Vozvraschenie Chorba”, and the autobiography Speak, Memory, self-translated into Russian as Drugie berega (1954), re-written in English in a revised and extended edition in 1966, and somehow completed in a fictional text titled Look at the Harlequins! (1974).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11369/427849
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